Getting Your Dog Used to a Collar Isn’t as Hard as You Might Think. Here’s How

Dogs November 4, 2015 Admin 0

Some dogs get used to a collar and leash easily, but some need you to be patient and try a little harder. There aren’t... Getting Your Dog Used to a Collar Isn’t as Hard as You Might Think. Here’s How

Some dogs get used to a collar and leash easily, but some need you to be patient and try a little harder. There aren’t some complicated rules on how to get your dog used to a collar. Basically, the most important things you need are patience, confidence and calmness. Your dog may be scared of a collar, so you should go slowly in order not to traumatize the poor fellow.

1. Choose The Right Collar

There are many kinds of collars as well as leashes. First, you should buy a collar that fits your dog. If you buy one that you wish your dog to grow into, it will be uncomfortable and heavy and your dog won’t like it. The collar should be light and easy for your dog to wear, and it should be wide and flat (and not round). With a wide and flat, light collar, it won’t be hard for your dog get used to it and it will be easier on your dog’s throat. Finally, you should choose a collar that can be put on and off quickly (one with clips would be best), so the process would be stress-free.

2. Take It Slowly

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First, you need to familiarize your dogs with collars, introduce them to it. Don’t put the collar on if your dog is stressed out or chaotic. Wait until your dog is distracted with other things and then easily and simply attach the collar. When you’re putting it on, attach it loosely enough so that your dog doesn’t feel uncomfortable, but tight enough so your dog can’t wiggle out of it. When you put it on, interact with your dog, play with it or go for a walk/run and it will be relatively easy to take its mind off the collar.

When you’re trying to get your dog used to a collar, put it on even when you’re not going outside. For example, at feeding time, or when you’re doing some training. If you see that your dog is scratching the collar, it is time to start playing so it forgets about it.

When you want to remove the collar, wait until your dog is calm, because if it notices that it can get you to take the collar off while it’s making noise or other sorts of problems, you’ll be in trouble.

3. At First, Give Your Dog Treats When You Put The Collar On

Once your dog receives a treat for accepting the collar, it will associate it with something positive. The same thing applies for playtime – if you play each time after putting the collar, it will be glad to accept it.

However, only give your dog treats if it has calmly accepted the collar, and later they will behave calmly and obediently in order to get them. As time passes, you should stop giving treats for accepting the collar calmly, as it should become a normal thing. But when you start training your dog to do other things, treats can come in handy again.

Getting your dog used to a leash can take some time. It doesn’t all happen overnight, but if you show patience and you’re determined to make it work, you’ll probably have your dog happy to wear a leash by the time it receives its second shot and is able to go outside.

If you’ve adopted an adult stray dog and didn’t get a puppy, the process may take a little longer, but by following our guideline you will be successful without a doubt.



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